Seaview (Excerpt)

Full film: 11min 51s
For access to the full film
please inquire via email.

 For her experimental film  Seaview , Zinnia Naqvi travelled back to her family’s country of origin, Karachi, Pakistan, to compare childhood memories with present-day experiences. Seaview combines home video with recent footage, and overlaps text, audio conversations, and testimonials that often contradict the paired imagery in each sequence. Her narrative imparts the difficulties inherent in revisiting the past, both as an image-maker and as a woman.  Originally inspired by nineteenth-century ethnographic studies of the East by documentary photographers, Naqvi later realized the “Orientalist” implications of these images in their simplification of Eastern culture. Through Seaview, Naqvi questions the ability of any single medium to provide an adequate depiction of a place or culture. She confronts her personal struggle between the ideals of Western and Eastern societies, ultimately confounding any single understanding of Pakistani society. In doing so, she reveals the complications of translating culture across time and seas.  Photo by Jimmy Limit from exhibition at 8-11 in Toronto

For her experimental film Seaview, Zinnia Naqvi travelled back to her family’s country of origin, Karachi, Pakistan, to compare childhood memories with present-day experiences. Seaview combines home video with recent footage, and overlaps text, audio conversations, and testimonials that often contradict the paired imagery in each sequence. Her narrative imparts the difficulties inherent in revisiting the past, both as an image-maker and as a woman.

Originally inspired by nineteenth-century ethnographic studies of the East by documentary photographers, Naqvi later realized the “Orientalist” implications of these images in their simplification of Eastern culture. Through Seaview, Naqvi questions the ability of any single medium to provide an adequate depiction of a place or culture. She confronts her personal struggle between the ideals of Western and Eastern societies, ultimately confounding any single understanding of Pakistani society. In doing so, she reveals the complications of translating culture across time and seas.

Photo by Jimmy Limit from exhibition at 8-11 in Toronto

 Seaview - Ryerson Image Centre, Toronto 2016

Seaview - Ryerson Image Centre, Toronto 2016

Seaview (Excerpt)
 For her experimental film  Seaview , Zinnia Naqvi travelled back to her family’s country of origin, Karachi, Pakistan, to compare childhood memories with present-day experiences. Seaview combines home video with recent footage, and overlaps text, audio conversations, and testimonials that often contradict the paired imagery in each sequence. Her narrative imparts the difficulties inherent in revisiting the past, both as an image-maker and as a woman.  Originally inspired by nineteenth-century ethnographic studies of the East by documentary photographers, Naqvi later realized the “Orientalist” implications of these images in their simplification of Eastern culture. Through Seaview, Naqvi questions the ability of any single medium to provide an adequate depiction of a place or culture. She confronts her personal struggle between the ideals of Western and Eastern societies, ultimately confounding any single understanding of Pakistani society. In doing so, she reveals the complications of translating culture across time and seas.  Photo by Jimmy Limit from exhibition at 8-11 in Toronto
 Seaview - Ryerson Image Centre, Toronto 2016
Seaview (Excerpt)

Full film: 11min 51s
For access to the full film
please inquire via email.

For her experimental film Seaview, Zinnia Naqvi travelled back to her family’s country of origin, Karachi, Pakistan, to compare childhood memories with present-day experiences. Seaview combines home video with recent footage, and overlaps text, audio conversations, and testimonials that often contradict the paired imagery in each sequence. Her narrative imparts the difficulties inherent in revisiting the past, both as an image-maker and as a woman.

Originally inspired by nineteenth-century ethnographic studies of the East by documentary photographers, Naqvi later realized the “Orientalist” implications of these images in their simplification of Eastern culture. Through Seaview, Naqvi questions the ability of any single medium to provide an adequate depiction of a place or culture. She confronts her personal struggle between the ideals of Western and Eastern societies, ultimately confounding any single understanding of Pakistani society. In doing so, she reveals the complications of translating culture across time and seas.

Photo by Jimmy Limit from exhibition at 8-11 in Toronto

Seaview - Ryerson Image Centre, Toronto 2016

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